Urban Campus

Moore Hall

Moore Hall

Tudor College Style - Moore Hall

Moore Hall

During the January of 1968, the University of Richmond received approval for a $680,000 contract for the construction of a new dorm building that would be the new home to 150 male undergraduate students.  After Moore Hall was built, the university was able to take down the temporary World War II barracks that were used as overflow housing. The addition of this building to campus increased the number of men able to live on campus to 900 and with a student population that was growing quickly, new housing was a necessity on the Richmond campus.   In May 1969, this building was dedicated to T. Justin Moore, a distinguished lawyer who also served as a former member of the board of trustees, law professor, and rector of the board for the University of Richmond. Although this building originally housed men, today it stands as one of the two all-women's dormitory on the Richmond College side of campus.

Moore Hall was designed by Carneal and Johnston and constructed by Thorington Construction Company. Carneal and Johnston is an architecture firm that produced well over one thousand buildings and was typically employed by the government, businesses, churches and developers. As far as universities go, the University of Richmond is the only school that Carneal and Johnston created designs for (and they have designed many building on campus, including the majority of the dorms). Moore Hall was included in a central building plan that included a many of the dorms on the Richmond College side of campus. This included buildings such as Marsh, Moore, Wood, and Freeman Hall. This dormitory has a structure similar to one that is used in building a home, except the major support structures are made of steel instead of wood. Moore Hall, similar to all other dorm buildings designed by Carneal and Johnston, was designed using the collegiate gothic style and was constructed using red brick with limestone trim. Some parts of Moore are constructed using large pieces of wood and concrete that represents tudor cottage style. This dorm was built during a time when large amounts of housing were urgently needed so construction was meant to be fast and efficient.  Due to this pressing need for housing, Moore was the last building constructed during this time that used the time and money to include certain aesthic details. This included features such as the offset limestone bricks that border the entrances to the building or similar details that surround the windows on the building.  Moore Hall has not seen any major renovations during its lifetime except for one that was done near the turn of the century when the heating and air conditioning ventilation systems were installed.

Moore is a hall-style residential building, meaning it was a few communal bathrooms on each floor that are shared amongst the occupants. The vast majority of the rooms in Moore are doubles, but there are a few singles and triples scattered throughout the building.  The building was designed so that three wings exist on each floor (A, B, and C) except for the fourth floor.  Each wing on each floor has its own bathroom. Moore Hall has four floors, with the fourth floor occupying space that would otherwise be attic or wasted space. The first three floors include all three wings, but the fourth floor only has an A wing. The interesting thing about the fourth floor is that it is constructed so that normal, rectangular shaped rooms are carved out of the downward-sloping roof of the building.  Extra size is added to these rooms by adding in dormers, which are extensions of the room that stretch out through the roof with a window at the end, creating a small corridor with a window sill at the end of each room.  Each room comes with a desk, a closet, and a dresser for each student.  After this buildings only renovation, each room came equipped with independent heating and air conditioning units as well.

As mentioned previously, Moore Hall was built during a time when large numbers of students were starting to come to the University of Richmond. As a matter of fact, ground was broken on another mens dorm that can house 225 people after the dedication of Moore Hall.  Also, throughout the same time period, Dr. Modlin wrote in his president reports that there was also an acute need for Richmond College classroom and office space, recreational space for men, and dormitories for women. In addition, the funding for the Robin's Center, which included housing space for visiting teams, was received in 1969.  The 1968-1969 University of Richmond Directory indicates that the large number of students coming to the school at the time were coming from different states across the country.  More specifically, the distribution of students coming to the university from the east coast was strikingly similar to what it is today: Massachusetts, New Jersey, New York, Florida, Washington D.C., etc. There were also a few students coming from abroad, the most dominating international presence coming from Canada.  The directories also showed that most of the student population during this time was comprised of men.

Moore Hall